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Function of Auxiliary or Verb TO DO

Function of Auxiliary or Verb TO DO

Function of Auxiliary or Verb TO DO

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Function of Auxiliary or Verb TO DO

 After sharing about the function of Auxiliary TO BE in the previous post, now we want to share another kind of auxiliaries. In this case we want to share about Auxiliary TO DO. However, before discussing about auxiliary TO DO, it would be better if we recall our understanding about the meaning of Auxiliary verb. (Also read : Function and Pattern of Auxiliary Modal WOULD)

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 What is an auxiliary verb? An auxiliary verb (also called helping verb) is an auxiliary used to help/assist the main verb of the sentience.

 After having understand the meaning of an auxiliary, let’s we discuss about Auxiliary TO DO. The topic I’ll share is the function of TO DO, the kind and the examples in using TO DO.

A. The function of TO DO

There two main functions of TO DO. They are:

1. As Auxiliary

TO DO is function as auxiliary when there is a main verb (verb) after TO DO in a sentence. In this case, the sentence consists of auxiliary TO DO is called SIMPLE TENSE. read more

Function and Grammatical Structure of WISH

Function and Grammatical Structure of WISH

Function and Grammatical Structure of WISH

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Function and Grammatical Structure of WISH

 In the previous post we have explained the function of “WISH”. It is said that WISH is the expression of someone’s feeling that one would like to have or do something or to see something happen; a desire, longing, or strong inclination for a specific thing. (Also read : Meaning and Example of Common Noun)

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Examples:

  • We wish you a “Merry Ied-Al-Fitr.”
  • I wish to speak to your manager (Here wish acts like a command)

However, the function of “WISH” actually is not only as we have said above, but also there are also some function of WISH as below:

Wish + Simple Past Tense

“Wish” is used to talk about situations that we desire, but which are the opposite of the current reality or which are impossible. We can use wish + past tense to talk about our situation right now. Even though we use the past tense, we are NOT talking about the past.

For examples:

  • I wish I had a car. (In reality, I don’t have a car now, but I want one).
  • I wish I didn’t have to work tomorrow. (In reality, I have to work tomorrow, but I don’t want to).
  • I wish I were tall. (In reality, I’m short, but I want to be tall).

Wish + Past Continuous Tense

Wish is used to express that we want to be doing a different action in the present (or future). (Also read other article at : Fungsi Simple Present Tense) read more

Difference Between WILL and GOING TO

Difference Between WILL and GOING TO

Difference Between WILL and GOING TO

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Difference Between WILL and GOING TO

 As we know that “Going to” and “will” are used in the English language as the future tense. However, we sometimes feel confusing about how to differ of “Going to” and “will”. To make it clear, we are going to share the Difference Between WILL and GOING TO as shown below. (Also read : Definition and Example of Verb)

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We use WILL when:

  1. We want to talk about future facts or things that will be true about the future.
  • The President will serve for four years.
  • The train will arrive in 10 minutes.
  • The sun will rise in the morning.
  1. We want to make a promise, offer or a threat.
  • I will give you my homework if you help me with this task now.
  • I promise I will help you tomorrow.
  • I will study medicine at university.
  • I will stop going to the casino.
  1. We are making a decision at the moment of speaking. (Also read other article at : You Have to Love Yourself)
  • The ice-cream looks good. I think I will get one for John.
  • There’s no orange juice in the fridge. I will go and get some now.
  • A: What would you like to drink, sir?

 B: I will have a glass of milk, please.

  • A: Oh, you have left the door open.

 B: Have I? I will go and shut it.

We use TO BE GOING TO when:

  1. The decision has already been made
  • A: There is a good movie on TV tonight.

 B: Yes. I know. I am going to watch it.

  • A: Why is Betty in a hurry?

 B: Because she is going to meet her brother at the station at six.

  • I’m going to meet with her after work.
  • We’re going to come to your house at 8 am tomorrow.
  1. We are making a future prediction based on the evidence now. (Also read other article at : Pengertian dan Contoh Majas Anafora)
  • It’s going to rain soon. The sky is very cloudy, and I can hear a thunder.
  • The tea is too hot. You’re going to but your lips.
  • Look at those black clouds. It is going to rain.
  • A: What is the matter with you?

 B: I feel terrible. I think I am going to be ill.

  1. Something is about to happen
  • The bell is going to ring any minute now.
  • Oh, no! The balloon is going to pop now!
  • Careful! The bomb is going to explode.

 That’s all the post about the Difference Between WILL and GOING TO we can share for this occasion. We hope the post about the Difference words above can increase our English, especially our knowledge about grammar material. (Also read other article at : Latihan Soal Uraian Auxiliary Modal Can) read more

Difference between Simple Past and Past Continuous Tense

Difference between Simple Past and Past Continuous Tense

Difference between Simple Past and Past Continuous Tense

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Difference between Simple Past and Past Continuous Tense

 As we have already studied from the previous post before, both the Simple Past and the Past Continuous Tense refer to completed actions in the past time.  However, both of them actually have some differences. (Also read : Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense)

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Below are some differences

A. We use Simple Past Tense to talk about a finished action in the past, often with time expressions like yesterday, last week, a year ago etc. This is by far the most common way of talking about the past.

Examples:

  1. I lived there for 6 years.
  2. I only found out a few moments ago.
  3. I asked her but she didn’t know anything.
  4. The company made 100 people redundant last year.

B. The most common use of the past continuous tense is to talk about something that was happening around a particular time in the past [to emphasize the continuity of the action]. (Also read other article at : Gemuruh Petir Menyertai Hujan)

Examples:

  1. What were you doing at 8 o’clock last night? I was watching television.

(I started watching television before 8 o’clock and I continued watching it after 8 o’clock.)

  1. In 1994 he was working in a small town in Poland.

(he started working in 1994 and he continued working in a small town in Poland after 1994.) read more

Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense

Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense

Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense

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Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense

 As we have already studied before, both of Simple Present Tense and Present Continuous Tense are expressing the present activities, it means that the activities happen about the time of speaking. However, both of them have some differences. (Also read : Definition and Examples of Proper Nouns)

The differences can be shown as below:

A. The Simple Present Tense is used for:

  1. Regular actions or events
  • He plays tennis most weekends.
  • We have fasting a month on Ramadhan.
  • I eat rice three times a day.
  1. Facts
  • The sun rises in the east.
  • The earth is round.
  • Water consists of H2O.
  1. Facts known about the future
  • We leave at 8.30 next Monday.
  • They have meeting at 10.00 tomorrow.
  • Persebaya fights to Arema FC next Wednesday.
  1. Thoughts and feelings about the time of speaking
  • I don’t feel very well.
  • This meatball tastes delicious.

B. The Present Continuous is used for:

  1. The time of speaking (‘now’)
  • Shh, I’m trying to hear what they are saying .
  • We are using the Internet.
  • (Also read other article at : Jenis Profesi Dalam Bahasa Inggris)
  • He is studying English grammar.
  1. Things which are true at the moment but not always
  • We’re looking for a new flat.
  • I’m looking for a new apartment.
  • He’s thinking about leaving his job.
  • They’re considering making an appeal against the judgment.
  • Are you getting enough sleep?
  1. Present plans for the future
  • We’re having dinner with them next week.
  • We’re going on holiday tomorrow.
  • (Also read other article at : Beautiful Nature of Indonesia)
  • I’m meeting my boyfriend tonight.
  • Are they visiting you next rainy season?

For getting information about the differences of Simple Present Tense and Present Continuous Tense, let’s look at these examples :

  • I don’t usually have cereals for breakfast but I’m having some this morning because there is nothing else.
  • I often cycle to work but I’m taking the car this morning because it’s
  • raining very hard.
  • I’m thinking about having my hair cut short but I don’t think my
  • husband will be very happy about it.
  • My parents live in Washington but I’m just visiting.
  • She usually plays the violin, but he’s playing bass guitar tonight.
  • The weather forecast was good, but it’s raining at the moment.

Note how, in all these examples, we use the present continuous to talk about events which are temporary/limited in time and the present simple to talk about events which are habits/permanent.

 That’s all the material about Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense we can share for this occasion. We hope the post above can increase our understanding about Grammar, especially about the Difference Between Simple and Present Continuous Tense. (Also read other article at : UAS Bahasa Inggris Kelas 11 Semester 2) read more

Definition and Function of Bare Infinitive

Definition and Function of Bare Infinitive

Definition and Function of Bare Infinitive

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Definition and Function of Bare Infinitive

 As we have discussed about definition of verb before, that a verb is the action word in a sentence that describe what the subject is doing.  And in this session, we’d like to continue discussing about verb, in this case we will discuss about Bare Infinitive. For this we are going to discuss about definition of Bare Infinitive and its function. (Also read : Difference Between Farther and Further)

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This is the material about Definition of Bare Infinitive and its Function:

Definition of Bare Infinitive

Bare Infinitive is an infinitive verb that’s not preceded by the particle to.

Example:

  • Walk (bare infinitive)
  • To walk (to infinitive)
  • Play (bare infinitive)
  • To play (to infinitive)

Examples in sentences:

  • They go. (go = bare infinitive)
  • Rina can sing English song. (sing = bare infinitive)
  • She made me cry. (cry = bare infinitive)
  • (Also read other article at : I Love My Sister)

Function (Use) of Bare Infinitive

  1. The bare infinitive is used as the main verb after the auxiliary verb ‘do’

Examples:

  • Don’t be late!
  • Do you want some tea?
  • He didn’t eat meat.
  1. The bare infinitive is used as the main verb after the auxiliary modal (should, can, will, may, must, etc)

Examples:

  • She must go.
  • We will do the exam.
  • Rama can change his habit.
  1. The bare infinitive is used after verbs of perception (see, hear)

Examples;

  • Several witnesses saw the boy leave the sidewalk.
  • I heard a famous opera singer sing at the concert last night.
  1. The bare infinitive is used after the verbs make and let

Example:

  • My sister made me try it.
  • My teacher made me apologize for what I had said.
  • somebody makes you wear that ugly hat.
  • He let me go out.
  • Don’t let me cry!

(Also read other article at : Rumusan Pancasila Menurut Para Tokoh)

  1. The bare infinitive is used after the expressions had better and would rather.

Examples:

  • I’d rather work on the land than work in a factory
  • I’d rather be a teacher than an officer.
  • He’d rather go by bicycle.
  • You had better take some warm clothing.
  • They had better work harder on their grammar!
  • We’d better go home now.

 I think that’s all the grammar material about Definition of Bare Infinitive we can share for this occasion. We hope the post about definition of Bare Infinitive and its function above can be useful to improve our English, especially about grammar material. (Also read other article at : UAS Bahasa Inggris Kelas 10 Semester 2) read more

Meaning and Example of Common Noun

Meaning and Example of Common Noun

Meaning and Example of Common Noun

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Meaning and Example of Common Noun

 In our daily life, it is no doubt that we always talk about noun every day, whether they are noun about names of people, places, things or others. For this we want to share about Meaning and Examples of Common Noun. In this material we will discuss about the Meaning of Common and its examples. (Also read : Definition and Example Collective Noun)

The Meaning of Common Nouns

 As we know that a noun is a part of speech that identifies a person, place, thing, or idea. It means that all nouns serve to name a person, place, or thing.

 After getting the information about the meaning of noun, we now should know about the meaning of Common Noun.

 A common noun is a non-specific person, place, or thing.

 A common noun is used to name general things, places, ideas, events, or people. They are words that refer to things in general terms, and not in specific terms. People are also named through common nouns. Even their official names or titles, such as teacher, preacher, clerk, police officer, delivery driver, grandma, and cousin are common nouns. For example, in the sentence,  “Differences of habit and language are nothing at all if our aims are identical and our hearts are open.” (Also read other article at : Rain Brings Thousand Memories) read more

Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb

Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb

Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb

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Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb

 As we have shared in the previous post that a Verb is an action word in a sentence that describe what the subject is doing. And for continuing our discussion about VERB, here we are going to discuss about Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb. Although the title is Definition of Transitive and Intransitive Verb but we also discuss about examples of it. So, let’s go to the material. (Also read : Kinds or Types of Verb)

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Transitive Verb

Definition of Transitive Verb

 A transitive verb is a verb that requires an object to receive the action.

Example:

  • The speaker discussed different marketing strategies in the video.
  • She baked some cookies.
  • He rode the bicycle.
  • We moved the chair.
  • I stitched a quilt.
  • The instructor addressed the student’s question.
  • Miriam borrowed the methodology book from her classmate because she forgot her copy.
  • Can you bring your copy of the textbook to our study group meeting?
  • Donovan gave the gift to his sister.
  • The committee members will raise money for the new project.

Intransitive Verb

Definition of Intransitive Verb

 An intransitive verb does not take an object. Using an object immediately after an intransitive verb will create an incorrect sentence.  However, there may be other information after the verb, such as one or more prepositional phrases or an adverb. (Also read other article at : Dashing Boy Scout)

Example

  • She sneezed loudly.
  • Your baby cries a lot.
  • His grandfather died last year.
  • The rain fell heavily.
  • I was waiting but nothing happened.
  • The jokes were not funny and nobody laughed.
  • The book fell.
  • The horse galloped.
  • The sun set.
  • The patient’s health deteriorated quickly.
  • Ahmad voted in the local election.
  • May I sit here?
  • Attendance increased at the weekly study sessions as finals drew near.
  • Susan laughed.

Notes: An intransitive verb can take more than one prepositional phrase or adverb.

  • The patient’s health deteriorated quickly during the night.
  • Ahmad voted for the incumbent in the local election.

Verbs That Are Both Transitive and Intransitive

 Some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive, depending on the situation.  In some instances, such a verb may require an object, while in others it does not require an object. (Also read other article at : Soal USBN IPS SMP) read more

Kinds or Types of Verb

Kinds or Types of Verb

Kinds or Types of Verb

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Kinds or Types of Verb

 As we have shared in the previous post that a Verb is an action word in a sentence that describe what the subject is doing. And for continuing our discussion about VERB, here we are going to discuss about Kinds or Types of Verb.

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 Actually, there are two groups of main verbs, action verbs (Transitive Verbs and Intransitive Verbs) and no-action verbs (To Be and Linking Verbs), but we break down into four Kinds types of main verbs. And Helping Verbs. (Also read : Kinds and Examples of Auxiliary TO BE)

  1. Transitive Verb

Transitive verbs are those action verbs that can have a noun attached directly to them.

Examples:

  • She writes a book.
  • They hit ball,
  • The students answer questions.
  1. Intransitive Verb

Intransitive verbs are those action verbs that cannot attach directly to a noun; they need the help of a preposition. (Also read other article at : Fungsi dan Rumus Modal WOULD)

Example:

  • We walk to the drug store.
  • He slept on the sofa.
  • they comply with the regulations.
  1. TO BE

The verb to be can serve either as a main verb or as an auxiliary verb. When it acts as a main verb, it typically couples a grammatical subject with an adjective(predicate adjective). read more

Definition and Example of Verb

Definition and Example of Verb

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Definition and Example of Verb

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Definition and Example of Verb

 As we know that a sentence is a group of words which, when they are written down, begin with a capital letter and end with a full stop, question mark, or exclamation mark. A complete sentence has at least a subject and a main verb to state (declare) a complete thought. So, most sentences contain a subject and a verb. (Also read : The Function of Imperative Sentence)

 And in this occasion, we’d like to discuss about VERB, in this case we are going to discuss about Definition and Example of Verb. Let’s go to the topic:

Definition of Verb

 A Verb is the action word in a sentence that describe what the subject is doing. Along with noun, verb is the main part of a sentence or phrase, telling a story about what is taking place. In fact, without a verb, full thoughts can’t be properly conveyed, and even the simplest sentences, such as Maria sings, have one. Actually, a verb can be a sentence by itself, with the subject, in most case you, implied, such as, Sing! and Drive! (Also read other article at : Dark Vision Consequence) read more