Story of Aladdin part 2 Princess Jasmine

Aladdin and Princess Jamine
Aladdin Part 2

      Story of Aladdin part 2 Princess Jasmine. On the previous I have shared the story of Aladdin part one entitled Aladdin and the Magic Lamp. And now it is the time for continuing the second part of Aladdin entitled Aladdin and the Princess Jasmine

      One day Aladdin heard an order from the Sultan proclaimed that everyone was to stay at home and close his shutters while the princess, his daughter, went to and from the bath. His daughter’s name was Jasmine. Aladdin was seized by a desire to see her face, which was very difficult, as she always went veiled. He hid himself behind the door of the bath, and peeped through a chink. The princess lifted her veil as she went in, and looked so beautiful that Aladdin fell in love with her at first sight.

       He went home to tell to his mother what he had seen that it made his mother was frightened. He told her he loved the princess so deeply that he could not live without her, and meant to ask her in marriage of her father. His mother, on hearing this, burst out laughing, but Aladdin at last prevailed upon her to go before the Sultan and carry his request. She fetched a napkin and laid in it the magic fruits from the enchanted garden, which sparkled and shone like the most beautiful jewels. She took these with her to please the Sultan, and set out, trusting in the lamp. The grand-vizier and the lords of council had just gone in as she entered the hall and placed herself in front of the Sultan. He, however, took no notice of her. She went every day for a week, and stood in the same place.

       When the council broke up on the sixth day the Sultan said to his vizier: “I see a certain woman in the audience-chamber every day carrying something in a napkin. Call her next time that I may find out what she wants.”

       Next day, at a sign from the vizier, she went up to the foot of the throne, and remained kneeling till the Sultan said to her: “Rise, good woman, and tell me what you want.”

       She hesitated, so the Sultan sent away all but the vizier, and bade her speak freely, promising to forgive her beforehand for anything she might say. She then told him of her son’s violent love for the princess.

       “I prayed him to forget her,” she said, “but in vain; he threatened to do some desperate deed if I refused to go and ask your Majesty for the hand of the princess. Now I pray you to forgive not me alone, but my son Aladdin.”

       The Sultan asked her kindly what she had in the napkin, whereupon she unfolded the jewels and presented them.

       He was thunderstruck, and turning to the vizier said: “What safest you? Ought I not to bestow the princess on one who values her at such a price?”

       The vizier, who wanted her for his own son, begged the Sultan to withhold her for three months, in the course of which he hoped his son would contrive to make him a richer present. The Sultan granted this, and told Aladdin’s mother that, though he consented to the marriage, she must not appear before him again for three months.

       Aladdin waited patiently for nearly three months, but after two had elapsed his mother, going into the city to buy oil, found everyone rejoicing, and asked what was going on.

       “Do you not know,” it was the answer from other, “that the son of the grand-vizier is to marry the Sultan’s daughter to-night?”

    Breathless, she ran and told Aladdin, who was overwhelmed at first, but presently bethought him of the lamp. He rubbed it, and the genie appeared, saying: “What is thy will?”

       Aladdin replied: “The Sultan, as you know, has broken his promise to me, and the vizier’s son is to have the princess. My command is that tonight you bring hither the bride and bridegroom.”

       “Master, I obey,” said the genie.

       Aladdin then went to his chamber, where, sure enough at midnight the genie transported the bed containing the vizier’s son and the princess.

      “Take this new-married man,” he said, “and put him outside in the cold, and return at daybreak.”

       Whereupon the genie took the vizier’s son out of bed, leaving Aladdin with the princess.

       “Fear nothing,” Aladdin said to her; “you are my wife, promised to me by your unjust father, and no harm shall come to you.”

       The princess was too frightened to speak, and passed the most miserable night of her life, while Aladdin lay down beside her and slept soundly. At the appointed hour the genie fetched in the shivering bridegroom, laid him in his place, and transported the bed back to the palace.

       Presently the Sultan came to wish his daughter good-morning. The unhappy vizier’s son jumped up and hid himself, while the princess would not say a word, and was very sorrowful.

      The Sultan sent her mother to her, who said: “How comes it, child that you will not speak to your father? What has happened?”

       The princess sighed deeply, and at last told her mother how, during the night, the bed had been carried into some strange house, and what had passed there. Her mother did not believe her in the least, but bade her rise and consider it an idle dream.

       The following night exactly the same thing happened, and next morning, on the princess’s refusing to speak, the Sultan threatened to cut off her head. She then confessed all, bidding him ask the vizier’s son if it were not so. The Sultan told the vizier to ask his son, who owned the truth, adding that, dearly as he loved the princess, he had rather die than go through another such fearful night, and wished to be separated from her. His wish was granted, and there was an end of feasting and rejoicing.

       When the three months were over, Aladdin sent his mother to remind the Sultan of his promise. She stood in the same place as before, and the Sultan, who had forgotten Aladdin, at once remembered him, and sent for her. On seeing her poverty the Sultan felt less inclined than ever to keep his word, and asked the vizier’s advice, who counseled him to set so high a value on the princess that no man living could come up to it.

       The Sultan then turned to Aladdin’s mother, saying: “Good woman, a Sultan must remember his promises, and I will remember mine, but your son must first send me forty basins of gold brimful of jewels, carried by forty black slaves, led by as many white ones, splendidly dressed. Tell him that I await his answer.” The mother of Aladdin bowed low and went home, thinking all was lost.

       She gave Aladdin the message, adding, “He may wait long enough for your answer!”

       “Not so long, mother, as you think,” her son replied “I would do a great deal more than that for the princess.”

       He summoned the genie, and in a few moments the eighty slaves arrived, and filled up the small house and garden.

       Aladdin made them set out to the palace, two and two, followed by his mother. They were so richly dressed, with such splendid jewels in their girdles that everyone crowded to see them and the basins of gold they carried on their heads.

       They entered the palace, and, after kneeling before the Sultan, stood in a half-circle round the throne with their arms crossed, while Aladdin’s mother presented them to the Sultan.

       He hesitated no longer, but said: “Good woman, return and tell your son that I wait for him with open arms.”

       She lost no time in telling Aladdin, bidding him make haste. But Aladdin first called the genie.

       “I want a scented bath,” he said, “a richly embroidered habit, a horse surpassing the Sultan’s, and twenty slaves to attend me. Besides this, six slaves, beautifully dressed, to wait on my mother; and lastly, ten thousand pieces of gold in ten purses.”

       No sooner said than done. Aladdin mounted his horse and passed through the streets, the slaves strewing gold as they went. Those who had played with him in his childhood knew him not, he had grown so handsome.

     When the Sultan saw him he came down from his throne, embraced him, and led him into a hall where a feast was spread, intending to marry him to the princess that very day. But Aladdin refused, saying, “I must build a palace fit for her,” and took his leave.

       Once home he said to the genie, “Build me a palace of the finest marble, set with jasper, agate, and other precious stones. In the middle you shall build me a large hall with a dome, its four walls of massy gold and silver, each side having six windows, whose lattices, all except one, which is to be left unfinished, must be set with diamonds and rubies. There must be stables and horses and grooms and slaves; go and see about it!”

       The palace was finished by next day, and the genie carried him there and showed him all his orders faithfully carried out, even to the laying of a velvet carpet from Aladdin’s palace to the Sultan’s. Aladdin’s mother then dressed herself carefully, and walked to the palace with her slaves, while he followed her on horseback. The Sultan sent musicians with trumpets and cymbals to meet them, so that the air resounded with music and cheers. She was taken to the princess, who saluted her and treated her with great honor. At night the princess said good-bye to her father, and set out on the carpet for Aladdin’s palace, with his mother at her side, and followed by the hundred slaves. She was charmed at the sight of Aladdin, who ran to receive her.

       “Princess,” he said, “Blame your beauty for my boldness if I have displeased you. “She told him that, having seen him, she willingly obeyed her father in this matter. After the wedding had taken place Aladdin led her into the hall, where a feast was spread, and she supped with him, after which they danced till midnight.

       The next day Aladdin invited the Sultan to see the palace. On entering the hall with the four-and-twenty windows, with their rubies, diamonds, and emeralds, he cried:

       “It is a world’s wonder! There is only one thing that surprises me. Was it by accident that one window was left unfinished?”

       “No, sir, by design,” returned Aladdin. “I wished your Majesty to have the glory of finishing this palace.”

       The Sultan was pleased, and sent for the best jewelers in the city. He showed them the unfinished window, and bade them fit it up like the others. “Sir,” replied their spokesman, “we cannot find jewels enough.”

       The Sultan had his own fetched, which they soon used, but to no purpose, for in a month’s time the work was not half done. Aladdin, knowing that their task was vain, bade them undo their work and carry the jewels back, and the genie finished the window at his command. The Sultan was surprised to receive his jewels again and visited Aladdin, who showed him the window finished. The Sultan embraced him, the envious vizier meanwhile hinting that it was the work of enchantment.

       “Will you make my daughter as a wife?”  Asked the Sultan. Aladdin was very happy to hear it. Then they both got married. After having marriage, Aladdin told how he started to love her and Jasmine also found out that people who she married was someone she loved. “I love you, not because of the treasure, but I love your courage and your heart.” Jasmine said. They then lived happily.

To be continued . . . .

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