Definition and Kinds of Pronoun

Kinds of Pronoun

       Definition and Kinds of Pronoun. Hello my dearest visitors, have a nice meeting again.

      In the previous post I have shared about Nouns and their classification. Have you read it? I hope so. In this occasion I will share the topic related to Nouns. It’s about Pronoun. Then let’s start for understanding about Pronoun.

Definition

       Generally (but not always) pronouns stand for (pro + noun) or refer to a noun, an individual or individuals or thing or things (the pronoun’s antecedent) whose identity is made clear earlier in the text.

For instance,

The students of Junior High School prepare for testThey have study hard every day.

They here is a pronoun referring to the students of Junior High School.

Not all pronouns will refer to an antecedent, however.

Everyone here like to watch film.

The word “everyone” has no antecedent.

Kinds of Pronouns:

  1. Personal
  2. Demonstrative
  3. Indefinite
  4. Relative
  5. Reflexive
  6. Intensive
  7. Interrogative
  8. Reciprocal

This kinds of Pronouns can be made a table as,

Pronoun
PersonalDemonstrativeIndefiniteRelative
I

Me

You

He

Him

She

Her

It

We

Us

You

They

Them

This

That

These

Those

Everybody

Anybody

Somebody

All

Each

Every

Some

None

One

Who

Whom

Which

Whoever

Whomever

Whichever

That

Pronoun
ReflexiveIntensiveInterrogativeReciprocal
Myself

Yourself

Yourselves

Himself

Herself

Itself

Ourselves

Themselves

 

Myself

Yourself

Herself

Ourselves

themselves

Who

Whom

Whose

Which

What

Whoever

Whomever

Whichever

Whatever

Each other

 

 

One another

Explanation

Kinds of Pronouns:

  1. Personal Pronouns

       Personal pronouns are pronouns that are associated primarily with a particular grammatical person – first person (as I), second person (as you), or third person (as he, she, it). Personal pronouns may also take different forms depending on number (usually singular or plural), grammatical or natural gender, case, and formality. The term “personal” is used here purely to signify the grammatical sense; personal pronouns are not limited to people and can also refer to animals and objects (as the English personal pronoun it usually does).

Examples

I like coffee.

Do you like coffee?

Did Ram beat him?

Anthony drove us.

  1. Demonstrative Pronouns

       The demonstrative pronouns are (this, that, these, and those) like all pronouns, they replace nouns. Demonstrative pronouns are used to replace specific people or things that have been previously mentioned (or are understood from context).

      A demonstrative pronoun tells us whether it is replacing something singular or plural and whether that thing(s) is close by or farther away.

Examples

This is ridiculous.

That is ridiculous.

These are ridiculous.

Those are ridiculous.

  1. Indefinite Pronouns

Indefinite pronoun (everybody/anybody/somebody/all/each/every/ some/none/one) do not substitute for specific nouns but function themselves as nouns (Everyone is wondering if any is left.)

Examples

All are welcome to come to the birthday party tonight.

Lizzie gave that book to someone and never got it back.

Anyone can play the game as long as they follow the rules.

Does anybody have a clue where the dog went?

  1. Relative Pronouns

       A relative pronoun is used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun. You see them used every day with the most common relative pronouns being: who, whom, which, whoever, whomever, whichever, and that.

      A relative pronoun is usually seen in a sentence at the beginning of an adjective clause. An adjective clause functions as an adjective, modifying nouns and pronouns.

Examples

This is the book that everyone is talking about.

She wrote to the person whom she had met last month.

We didn’t bring the receipt, which was a big mistake.

I have a friend whose cat is annoying.

  1. Reflexive Pronouns

       A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that is preceded or followed by the noun, adjective, adverb or pronoun to which it refers (its antecedent) within the same clause. In generative grammar, a reflexive pronoun is an anaphor that must be bound by its antecedent (see binding). In a general sense.

Examples

I like myself.

He spoke to himself.

She thumped herself.

The dog bit itself.

  1. Intensive Pronouns

     The intensive pronouns (such as myself, yourself, herself, ourselves, and themselves) consist of a personal pronoun plus self or selves and emphasize a noun. (I myself don’t know the answer.) It is possible (but rather unusual) for an intensive pronoun to precede the noun it refers to. (Myself, I don’t believe a word he says.)

Examples

Maria knew that she herself could make a positive impact on the world, if only she put her mind to it.

You yourself can easily transform your body: All it takes is a proper diet and plenty of exercise.

The team knew that they themselves were responsible for playing their best.

We ourselves are the ones who make the greatest impact upon the world we live in.

  1. Interrogative Pronouns

      An interrogative pronoun often stands for something that we are not aware of yet, because we are asking about it. We use these pronouns specifically to ask questions. These pronouns are special because they all start with “Wh”, which makes them easy to remember

Examples

Who won the race?

Whom shall we ask?

Which is the greater?

Whoever would want to eat such a gross thing?

Whatever did you say?

  1. Reciprocal Pronouns

        Reciprocal pronoun is a pronoun that expresses mutual action or relationship. In English the reciprocal pronouns are each other and one another.

       Reciprocal pronoun is used when two or more people or things are doing the same thing, and experiencing the same consequences. The reciprocal pronouns are each other and one another.

Examples

The boys made rude sounds and laughed at each other.

Shake hands with each other and make up.

At Lebaran Day, people give gifts to one another.

Love one another.

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